RAVPower 26800 review: A plentiful USB-C equipped pack with a number of ports

RAVPower 26800 review: A plentiful USB-C equipped pack with a number of ports

Note: The following is part of our roundup of USB-C battery packs.

The RAVPower 26,800 mAh (99.16Wh) ($65 on Amazon) battery pack is sleek and unassuming. Four indicator lights just above the power button blink and flash blue as the device is charging or discharging.

Four different ports adorn the front of the pack, with a microUSB port for charging, a USB-C port for charging or powering your phone, along with two USB-A ports with RAVPower’s “iSmart” technology.

Using its smarts, the RAVPower pack is supposed to detect and adjust current up to 2.4A, with a max of 3.5A output across all ports.

Total charge time through the microUSB port was nearly 11.5 hours, charging at 5V and 1.7A (out of an expected 5V/2A). Charging through USB-C using the company's included wall adapter drastically decreased charging time to four hours.

The biggest downside is the lack of QuickCharge 2.0 and 3.0 support. RAVPower does offer another mode with QC 3.0 and USB-C support; In exchange for faster charging, you lose a bit of capacity dropping the pack down to 20,100 mAh.

In testing, the battery stopped depleting at 81.33Wh, giving it an efficiency rating of 82%. Unfortunately, 82% puts it on the bottom half of the packs tested, just below the Anker PowerCore+ 85% efficiency, despite nearly identical capacity and capabilities.

Inside the box you will find a 30W Type-C Charger (something Google employee Benson Leung suggests you do not use with your phones, though it should be fine to charge this battery pack), a carrying case, and 2 microUSB cables.

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