ZeroLemon TouchJuice 30000 review: A rugged, ugly, yet fully capable battery pack

ZeroLemon TouchJuice 30000 review: A rugged, ugly, yet fully capable battery pack

Note: The following is part of our roundup of USB-C battery packs.

From the box it comes in to the power button on top of the pack, everything about the ZeroLemon ToughJuice ($80 on Amazon) screams “cheap.” I’m sorry, I can’t help but feel that way. However, my opinion of the pack was drastically changed over the course of my testing.

The ToughJuice pack is a whopping 30,000mAh (114Wh), and by far the most efficient battery pack we tested. When I discharged the ToughJuice, it stopped providing power at 106.33Wh—or 93.27% of its total capacity, putting it firmly at the top of the list among battery packs we tested.

There are a total of six ports on the pack, four of which accept USB-A connections. There’s also a USB-C port (5V/2.5A), and a microUSB input port for charging the pack.

Three ports are standard USB-A charging ports, with another offering Quick Charge 2.0 capabilities (verified through testing to deliver 8.82V/1.52A on an LG G5).

The pack is equipped with two power buttons, one on each side. Inside the buttons you’ll find four indicator lights, each one representing 25% of the battery’s capacity.

A removable protective casing wraps around the plastic housing, acting as an extra layer of protection for inevitable drops.

Recharging the ToughJuice pack took a whopping 13:46 from empty to full, due to impressive capacity and the input port operating at 5V/2A (I registered 5.06V/1.68A in my testing).

Included in the box is the ToughJuice pack and a microUSB cable.

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