Dan Swinhoe (Global) - The App Revolution: How this Varies By Market
Mobile Communications

Dan Swinhoe (Global) - The App Revolution: How this Varies By Market

"The iPad2 is equivalent to a 1986 Cray II supercomputer. It was the pre-eminent computer in the world. In 1993 the iPad2 would have been considered one of the 30 fastest computers in the world."
George Colony, CEO, Forrester

Needless to say, computers have got a lot better in recent years. The age-old theory that processing doubles every 18 months and storage doubles every 12 months, all the while becoming cheaper means that our hand-held devices now contain even greater potential than ever before. Much of this potential is being channelled through apps, and with sales of smartphones having now surpassed 1 billion this year, this isn't a trend that will be dissipating anytime soon.

App culture has become ubiquitous; Google's Our Mobile Planet series shows featured app stats for a variety of countries, including who has the most, who can't live without them, and the free/paid for ratio. According to the stats, Japan is the most ‘appy', but Germany is amongst the most keen to pay. But whichever country you view the stats for, the numbers point to more apps being used by more people - both app use and development have spread like wildfire across the world.

ourmobileplanet

According to 148apps, the Apple store has 719,452 apps available, and to buy them all would set you back a hefty $1,307,715.69. Unsurprisingly, Angry Birds Star Wars is currently dominating the App store charts. By the end of the year, over 45 billion apps will have been downloaded - around 15 billion of those from Google, but you can expect Android to take the majority share in 2013 due to the sheer number of devices being sold using the search engine's OS. Microsoft's own appstore is yet to make significant inroads in any market but, depending on the success of its Surface tablet this could well change after Christmas.


Mobile App Store Downloads, Worldwide, 2010-2016 (Millions of Downloads)
untitled

For all the talk about different capabilities and functions smartphones and tablets have, app metrics for both iOS and Android say the same thing; people like games. In all the charts, no matter what system or country, games feature heavily in both free and paid for. There are exceptions, e.g. Whatsapp, Youtube or Facebook, but the charts seem to say procrastination is the name of the game. Gartner predicts that free apps will account for 89% of those downloads, but that doesn't mean there's no money to be made or value that can be found from the app revolution.

Several of the most expensive apps available, a few coming in at an expenses form-busting $999.99, are business-related - cashier systems, agricultural, resource-recycling, process analyzers, even veterinary diagnostic helpers, are available. There's all sorts of business apps - from large scale monitoring, military-grade phone encryption, or even smaller ones to keep track of ideas and expenses. And that's just off-the-shelf.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron is currently testing his new ‘Number 10 Dashboard', a new government mobile app that keeps track of data for housing, jobs, polls, and other info politicans need to try and do their job properly. It's due to be rolled out throughout Whitehall next year, and DC even plans to show it off to Barrack Obama at the next G8 Summit. 

ourmobileplanet

Custom-app building continues to grow, today's estimates putting the average cost of development at around $30-40,000. According to a report by Appaccelerator, Apple has become the chosen platform for enterprise app development, with 53.2% of developers picking iOS for corporate app development.

Does all this point to the death of the web, and the rise of the ‘app-internet'? While it's true many companies are moving away from web towards an app-based culture -Google thrives on the web but hasn't stopped its march towards Android & apps - so don't start measuring the casket yet. In the same way some experts talk about the death of the PC despite there still being life in the old monitor yet, the internet isn't going anywhere soon.

While things such as social media and certain business software are now fully-apped, other areas are still a while off. For example media outlets are still struggling to cope with apps (web is still a struggle for many), while the largest programs - CAD/CAM and other large engineering/graphics programs simply are too big and complex for apps and mobile devices. At least for now.

What's your view? Is the internet dying? Does your company embrace the app?

All this talk of Apps got your downloading finger twitching? There's an app for that! Try our IDG Connect app- get our blog straight to your mobile device

By Dan Swinhoe, Editorial Assistant, IDG Connect,

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Comments

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Roger Kellerman on November 23 2012

The App concept is the old fashion Client server concept with new technology. I don't to carry a computer with apps of information. I want access to application and information in a secure way. Safari is my access to application on the internet.

no-images

Carl Reed on November 23 2012

The internet is not dying. Apps may/will create some interesting issues related to the evolution of the Web. However, the Web is built on the internet. The internet is a communications network that connects computers, mobile devices, sensors, and so forth built on a suite of Internet protocol standards. The internet is growing and will continue to grow as it provides a standard infrastructure for deploying applications and interconnecting new devices - think the internet of things.

no-images

Adesanya Ahmed on November 23 2012

I still don't understand what you mean by dying internet, at least if you are talking about apps on your mobile equipment, i believe you still need an internet connectivity since most of the apps were on cloud. What i believe you should be talking about is security, now that we have a lot of apps developers and more are still coming we need to be more concern about the originality of the developer if his intention is not to arm the users.Because this bad guys will always look an opportunity to leverage on.

no-images

Dalton on November 24 2012

"Apps versus internet" is like "cars versus highway". It's nonsensical to relate them as in any way adversarial.

no-images

Terry Tuck on November 24 2012

Security issues with current browsers and JavaScript will likely increase use of apps in the near future. In the long run, server-based code of "the Internet" seems to be the ideal paradigm.

no-images

Nelson Swartz on November 24 2012

I agree that apps are just repackaged client/server technology. I think it comes down to how many apps you want taking up space on your mobile devices. If I have the option of an app or the browser for information, I choose the browser. However, if I am going to be off the net, then an app makes sense.

no-images

Paolo on November 24 2012

try deploying an app without internet.

no-images

John Lee on November 24 2012

Since this is IDG do be accurate about the Internet, the underlying infrastructure of the WWWW ie Web. Apps and browsers will continue to use the Internet to access information but apps will have a very focused target where browsers are for more general use. I and others have written small focused programs, now called Apps for years such as calculator or money conversion. This was usually the result of the computers limitations like smart phones and (i)pads which have limited batteries which means limited processors, memory, disk and USB ports. There are less limited than the 4-16k computers Apple 2 I have used in the past. The software cycle is complete from simple to complex to simple apps. Now how do you integrate all those simple apps data when you want to take one or more app outputs and tie them together.

no-images

Michael Ayres on November 24 2012

I echo Carl Reed. The web, and dozens of other service use the Internet, which was around long the web went commercial around 1994 or so.

no-images

Michael Brill on November 24 2012

Seriously, as Roger posted, this is the client/server model at its most dysfunctional. Isolated apps that don't talk to each other, have fragmented user bases, are impossible to navigate once you get more than several dozen, and force companies to turn a single feature in a full-on app because they have no other deployment mechanism. It's an unsustainable mess. Mobile is still waiting for its Netscape moment... IMHO, it won't be the mobile web browser but rather something that enables us to express what we want, not how to get it. Then the network figures out how to solve the problem and pushes us the application content we need, when we need it. Humans are way over-saturated with either apps or the web, so we need something that takes the burden off of them. We're seeing a bit of that with Google Now, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. What is certain though is that 2,000,000 apps is no better than 1,000,000 apps.

no-images

Drew Diskin on November 24 2012

Apps are just another way to utilize the Internet --and thus, extending its life. Two decades ago, PointCast acted very similar to the same hub-and-spoke model of content delivery from the Internet to a local device (PC). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PointCast_(dotcom)

no-images

Lawrence Hughes on November 25 2012

This is a very silly article. It seems to confuse the World Wide Web with the Internet as a whole. The First Internet (based on IPv4) has been around since 1/1/83. The WWW is rather more recent, and involves really only two of the hundreds of protocols supported on the Internet (http and https). There are many things even today running on the Internet other than those protocols. In fact, the majority of traffic is from P2P now, which has nothing to do with the WWW. Apps communicate with servers via mostly other protocols than WWW, although you can use the web from a browser. We have a whole generation of Internet users who don't realize there is anything outside of their browsers. They even have web front ends to their email. The web metaphor (and http, html, etc) are very limiting. It is good to see people going beyond those brain damaged protocols. You can get far better responsiveness with native apps running on your device, that only use the Internet to exchange data, rather than your entire screen. What you may be seeing is the beginning of the death of the WEB, not the Internet. In fact, the Second Internet (based on IPv6) was officially launched on 6/6/12, and is now expanding rapidly. It is far more capable, and has no NAT to limit your connectivity. You will see a whole new generation of global end-to-end applications. You can surf the web over IPv6, but the web was a creature of the severely damaged IPv4+NAT internet. We can go way beyond the client/server model with IPv6. Have a look at the Internet outside of the web - it's an amazing place.

no-images

Jessica Szempruch on November 25 2012

The Internet is alive and well, and will continue to be, as it is the backbone of our increasingly connected world. Apps evolved into what they are because of the Internet. There is a natural symbiotic relationship between the two; a a bond that will continue to evole as the technology that drives it advances.

no-images

Alex on November 25 2012

Do not confuse web sites with Internet or internet Technology will continue to grow

no-images

David Williams on November 25 2012

I don't think the web is dying, just the opposite is happening. I feel that the threat of an app is that it might overload the web. One thing an app can do is to make using the web easier for new users. They may not become web experts, but they are using the web like never before. The apps being created now are just making the net easier to use. New users are utilizing the web like never before and they don't even know they're using the web. They can collect their data and run it through their process's and never know where they went to do the work. I really think the web is getting easier to use with the big web browsers, and now these apps are making it even easier. I know app users that have no clue where their information is coming from. Is the internet dying, no. Is the net getting easier to use, oh yes. Web traffic will keep growing, and working with the info obtained from the web will get easier.

no-images

Peter Heinicke on November 25 2012

Not at all. The internet is a plumbing system. Apps are better, smarter ways to shape the data that comes out, but the high cost of development means that the world wide web will continue to be important as a means for the end user to put content out there. And I have to quibble, Grove's law (the idea that memory and speed will double every 18 months) is not an "age-old" concept by any means. Unless you are measuring time in computer time rather than human time.

no-images

George Porter on November 26 2012

Andy Grove once said, "Imagine a world where infinite bandwidth meets infinite mips"...and for all intents and purposes we are virtually living in that world right now. The Next IT Wave we must all imagine is a world where infinite apps reach infinite data sources. While we are not quite there yet, we are accelerating towards that point asymtotically. In the first case the result Andy Grove foresaw was a world of infinite economic potential...derived from the exponential growth of the number of 'users' and the number of 'uses' of computers and data...which made Intel feel very good about itself in 1999. But in the second case we are already seeing the permutations of the absolute number of apps in the world, in the hands of exponentially growing numbers of users in the world, running all they mips they need to reach near infinite sources of data in the world. This technical empowerment is resulting in 'infinite' complexity and difficulty in controlling data access, data quality, data availability and data security in the world! For all intents and purposes we are already way out of control due to the abundance of Users' use tools (apps) and the abundance of mips to create, read, update/change and delete data and the more apps we add, the more islands of data we are creating at a geometric rate and the faster these fundamentally critical problems grow. The result of this uncontrolled march of users' uses of apps to exponentially growing sources of data is mankinds' effective permanent loss of any valid kind of an "authoritative source of the truth" and our complete inability to postively identify, authenticate and control who can create, access and change and delete the data in the trillions to potentially infinite numbers of places it resides. What are the consequences of losing "truth in our data and control over who can create and change that data"...we are about to see that world is the place we are living now. The Next Wave of IT innovation must begin solving for the exponential growth and fragmentation of data sources by app users and the concomitant exponential risks it brings to security, availability, accuracy and the costs of data storage. Cheaper media on which to store more data that is vulnerable to these issues is not the answer. Security by obfuscation involving more ID management complexity is not the answer either. The Next Wave must find the answers to these treats to our very civilization, or the value of what we have on our computers will continue to trend downward zero.

no-images

Alan Hale on November 26 2012

The App Culture is big in early adopter Urban Markets, but is unknown among those who have no mobile devices other than cell phones and do no plan to buy any either, or any Smart Phones. And how would any of these Apps be distributed with no internet? Get real, many use the internet for research. The internet was founded for research, and it will survive just fine without the social crowd.

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Jay on November 26 2012

Stallman was right ! So called apps are just limited small programs that spy on you. They provide a limited function for the user, but provide commercial and demographic information that can be sold and aggregated for the profit of the carrier of app maker. Perhaps a slight over simplification/exaggeration, but at the base true.

no-images

RobertTurcotte on November 26 2012

"We thought that we had the answers, it was the questions we had wrong." - Bono. As other comment posters have observed, the internet is simply a conduit, a pipe if you will, that transports data around the world. Whether an internet user moves data through the internet using a browser or an app isn’t important. The internet transports the data to the user’s device. So when the question “Is the internet dying?” is asked at the end of the article, it’s obvious that the question is wrong. The question inside the article “Does all this point to the death of the web, and the rise of the ‘app-internet'?” is likely more along the thinking the author intended. My guess is that someone other than the author wrote the question at article’s end, caught in confusion over the fact that a browser uses the web AND the internet to move and view data, while the app displays data moved through the internet. That makes the correct question something like, “Is the (web, browser, or search) dying?” Pick the word that best suits your thinking.

no-images

Kevin Fream on November 26 2012

Apps put you back in the way-back machine. You don't know which ones are any good and spend all of your time browsing and trying out junk with very little quality. Get a Surface tablet and you already have the apps you need to be productive.

no-images

Frank G on November 26 2012

This sounds like a FoxNews "Breaking News" story title geared for the average (low) IQ in the U.S. This article is more about 'client/server' myopia of apps vs the traditional web; its not about "The Internet" dying. Btw, the Web sits on top of the Internet. They are not the same thing. People like apps. The Web has not been about apps until the recent emergence of HTML5 (which is a wave we'll ride for the next 10 years). And Internet2 with all its fantastic potential will not be pervasive in any of our lifetimes; Infrastructure changes are done *slowly*... Big infrastructure changes are done *glacially*.

no-images

John O'Brien on November 27 2012

Think about this. An app in the user sense is? It is an elegant sometimes cool GUI to launch a service or task at the push of a button. One click not several. I have downloaded a few in my time using Android,Rim & Apple. I utilise about 20 on regular basis. I usually try out one or two that catch my fancy a week and then dump them if they are crap or dump the old one I am replacing it with. I have continued to get a new smart phone each year and that helps get the best Apps as the come to market as tests for free. It is cheaper to switch devices than waiting for software to be developed for older phones & tablets. The devices get better & cheaper each year. I was a big beleiver in Carr & IT Doesn't Matter Harvard fame but when you can get the good relability on a Samsung tablet for $200 why wait. The net is evolving not dying and a lot of Being Digital, Negroponte 1995 has come to pass. How many apps can you really use all the time maybe 30 to a 100 max. Some hard core gamers have maybe 500 to 1000 but they only follow the latest. I have used and discarded lots to date always on the hunt for the latest & useful. I think what is happening is just continuing extention of open sourcing,wide distribution, hacks,development & repackaging. It is interesting to note that one platform apps always cost a bit, while on the alternative platform you can get the same or similar for free. Longway to go before the web dies it is just a baby by my reckoning.

no-images

Bill Palmer on November 27 2012

As others have pointed out, the issue is not the "internet", it is how specific applications are implemented. Apps are specific to a device and typically utilize services available on that device, e.g., GPS, accelerometers, etc. HTML5 applications can run full multimedia programs in the browser without using plugins but can access some device specific services via a limited set of Application Program Interfaces (APIs). The real power of HTML5 is that applications can run anywhere, are not dependent upon device characteristics not accessible to it and hence are write once, use everywhere.

no-images

Roger Kellerman on November 23 2012

The App concept is the old fashion Client server concept with new technology. I don't to carry a computer with apps of information. I want access to application and information in a secure way. Safari is my access to application on the internet.

no-images

Carl Reed on November 23 2012

The internet is not dying. Apps may/will create some interesting issues related to the evolution of the Web. However, the Web is built on the internet. The internet is a communications network that connects computers, mobile devices, sensors, and so forth built on a suite of Internet protocol standards. The internet is growing and will continue to grow as it provides a standard infrastructure for deploying applications and interconnecting new devices - think the internet of things.

no-images

Adesanya Ahmed on November 23 2012

I still don't understand what you mean by dying internet, at least if you are talking about apps on your mobile equipment, i believe you still need an internet connectivity since most of the apps were on cloud. What i believe you should be talking about is security, now that we have a lot of apps developers and more are still coming we need to be more concern about the originality of the developer if his intention is not to arm the users.Because this bad guys will always look an opportunity to leverage on.

no-images

Dalton on November 24 2012

"Apps versus internet" is like "cars versus highway". It's nonsensical to relate them as in any way adversarial.

no-images

Terry Tuck on November 24 2012

Security issues with current browsers and JavaScript will likely increase use of apps in the near future. In the long run, server-based code of "the Internet" seems to be the ideal paradigm.

no-images

Nelson Swartz on November 24 2012

I agree that apps are just repackaged client/server technology. I think it comes down to how many apps you want taking up space on your mobile devices. If I have the option of an app or the browser for information, I choose the browser. However, if I am going to be off the net, then an app makes sense.

no-images

Paolo on November 24 2012

try deploying an app without internet.

no-images

John Lee on November 24 2012

Since this is IDG do be accurate about the Internet, the underlying infrastructure of the WWWW ie Web. Apps and browsers will continue to use the Internet to access information but apps will have a very focused target where browsers are for more general use. I and others have written small focused programs, now called Apps for years such as calculator or money conversion. This was usually the result of the computers limitations like smart phones and (i)pads which have limited batteries which means limited processors, memory, disk and USB ports. There are less limited than the 4-16k computers Apple 2 I have used in the past. The software cycle is complete from simple to complex to simple apps. Now how do you integrate all those simple apps data when you want to take one or more app outputs and tie them together.

no-images

Michael Ayres on November 24 2012

I echo Carl Reed. The web, and dozens of other service use the Internet, which was around long the web went commercial around 1994 or so.

no-images

Michael Brill on November 24 2012

Seriously, as Roger posted, this is the client/server model at its most dysfunctional. Isolated apps that don't talk to each other, have fragmented user bases, are impossible to navigate once you get more than several dozen, and force companies to turn a single feature in a full-on app because they have no other deployment mechanism. It's an unsustainable mess. Mobile is still waiting for its Netscape moment... IMHO, it won't be the mobile web browser but rather something that enables us to express what we want, not how to get it. Then the network figures out how to solve the problem and pushes us the application content we need, when we need it. Humans are way over-saturated with either apps or the web, so we need something that takes the burden off of them. We're seeing a bit of that with Google Now, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. What is certain though is that 2,000,000 apps is no better than 1,000,000 apps.

no-images

Drew Diskin on November 24 2012

Apps are just another way to utilize the Internet --and thus, extending its life. Two decades ago, PointCast acted very similar to the same hub-and-spoke model of content delivery from the Internet to a local device (PC). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PointCast_(dotcom)

no-images

Lawrence Hughes on November 25 2012

This is a very silly article. It seems to confuse the World Wide Web with the Internet as a whole. The First Internet (based on IPv4) has been around since 1/1/83. The WWW is rather more recent, and involves really only two of the hundreds of protocols supported on the Internet (http and https). There are many things even today running on the Internet other than those protocols. In fact, the majority of traffic is from P2P now, which has nothing to do with the WWW. Apps communicate with servers via mostly other protocols than WWW, although you can use the web from a browser. We have a whole generation of Internet users who don't realize there is anything outside of their browsers. They even have web front ends to their email. The web metaphor (and http, html, etc) are very limiting. It is good to see people going beyond those brain damaged protocols. You can get far better responsiveness with native apps running on your device, that only use the Internet to exchange data, rather than your entire screen. What you may be seeing is the beginning of the death of the WEB, not the Internet. In fact, the Second Internet (based on IPv6) was officially launched on 6/6/12, and is now expanding rapidly. It is far more capable, and has no NAT to limit your connectivity. You will see a whole new generation of global end-to-end applications. You can surf the web over IPv6, but the web was a creature of the severely damaged IPv4+NAT internet. We can go way beyond the client/server model with IPv6. Have a look at the Internet outside of the web - it's an amazing place.

no-images

Jessica Szempruch on November 25 2012

The Internet is alive and well, and will continue to be, as it is the backbone of our increasingly connected world. Apps evolved into what they are because of the Internet. There is a natural symbiotic relationship between the two; a a bond that will continue to evole as the technology that drives it advances.

no-images

Alex on November 25 2012

Do not confuse web sites with Internet or internet Technology will continue to grow

no-images

David Williams on November 25 2012

I don't think the web is dying, just the opposite is happening. I feel that the threat of an app is that it might overload the web. One thing an app can do is to make using the web easier for new users. They may not become web experts, but they are using the web like never before. The apps being created now are just making the net easier to use. New users are utilizing the web like never before and they don't even know they're using the web. They can collect their data and run it through their process's and never know where they went to do the work. I really think the web is getting easier to use with the big web browsers, and now these apps are making it even easier. I know app users that have no clue where their information is coming from. Is the internet dying, no. Is the net getting easier to use, oh yes. Web traffic will keep growing, and working with the info obtained from the web will get easier.

no-images

Peter Heinicke on November 25 2012

Not at all. The internet is a plumbing system. Apps are better, smarter ways to shape the data that comes out, but the high cost of development means that the world wide web will continue to be important as a means for the end user to put content out there. And I have to quibble, Grove's law (the idea that memory and speed will double every 18 months) is not an "age-old" concept by any means. Unless you are measuring time in computer time rather than human time.

no-images

George Porter on November 26 2012

Andy Grove once said, "Imagine a world where infinite bandwidth meets infinite mips"...and for all intents and purposes we are virtually living in that world right now. The Next IT Wave we must all imagine is a world where infinite apps reach infinite data sources. While we are not quite there yet, we are accelerating towards that point asymtotically. In the first case the result Andy Grove foresaw was a world of infinite economic potential...derived from the exponential growth of the number of 'users' and the number of 'uses' of computers and data...which made Intel feel very good about itself in 1999. But in the second case we are already seeing the permutations of the absolute number of apps in the world, in the hands of exponentially growing numbers of users in the world, running all they mips they need to reach near infinite sources of data in the world. This technical empowerment is resulting in 'infinite' complexity and difficulty in controlling data access, data quality, data availability and data security in the world! For all intents and purposes we are already way out of control due to the abundance of Users' use tools (apps) and the abundance of mips to create, read, update/change and delete data and the more apps we add, the more islands of data we are creating at a geometric rate and the faster these fundamentally critical problems grow. The result of this uncontrolled march of users' uses of apps to exponentially growing sources of data is mankinds' effective permanent loss of any valid kind of an "authoritative source of the truth" and our complete inability to postively identify, authenticate and control who can create, access and change and delete the data in the trillions to potentially infinite numbers of places it resides. What are the consequences of losing "truth in our data and control over who can create and change that data"...we are about to see that world is the place we are living now. The Next Wave of IT innovation must begin solving for the exponential growth and fragmentation of data sources by app users and the concomitant exponential risks it brings to security, availability, accuracy and the costs of data storage. Cheaper media on which to store more data that is vulnerable to these issues is not the answer. Security by obfuscation involving more ID management complexity is not the answer either. The Next Wave must find the answers to these treats to our very civilization, or the value of what we have on our computers will continue to trend downward zero.

no-images

Alan Hale on November 26 2012

The App Culture is big in early adopter Urban Markets, but is unknown among those who have no mobile devices other than cell phones and do no plan to buy any either, or any Smart Phones. And how would any of these Apps be distributed with no internet? Get real, many use the internet for research. The internet was founded for research, and it will survive just fine without the social crowd.

no-images

Jay on November 26 2012

Stallman was right ! So called apps are just limited small programs that spy on you. They provide a limited function for the user, but provide commercial and demographic information that can be sold and aggregated for the profit of the carrier of app maker. Perhaps a slight over simplification/exaggeration, but at the base true.

no-images

RobertTurcotte on November 26 2012

"We thought that we had the answers, it was the questions we had wrong." - Bono. As other comment posters have observed, the internet is simply a conduit, a pipe if you will, that transports data around the world. Whether an internet user moves data through the internet using a browser or an app isn’t important. The internet transports the data to the user’s device. So when the question “Is the internet dying?” is asked at the end of the article, it’s obvious that the question is wrong. The question inside the article “Does all this point to the death of the web, and the rise of the ‘app-internet'?” is likely more along the thinking the author intended. My guess is that someone other than the author wrote the question at article’s end, caught in confusion over the fact that a browser uses the web AND the internet to move and view data, while the app displays data moved through the internet. That makes the correct question something like, “Is the (web, browser, or search) dying?” Pick the word that best suits your thinking.

no-images

Kevin Fream on November 26 2012

Apps put you back in the way-back machine. You don't know which ones are any good and spend all of your time browsing and trying out junk with very little quality. Get a Surface tablet and you already have the apps you need to be productive.

no-images

Frank G on November 26 2012

This sounds like a FoxNews "Breaking News" story title geared for the average (low) IQ in the U.S. This article is more about 'client/server' myopia of apps vs the traditional web; its not about "The Internet" dying. Btw, the Web sits on top of the Internet. They are not the same thing. People like apps. The Web has not been about apps until the recent emergence of HTML5 (which is a wave we'll ride for the next 10 years). And Internet2 with all its fantastic potential will not be pervasive in any of our lifetimes; Infrastructure changes are done *slowly*... Big infrastructure changes are done *glacially*.

no-images

John O'Brien on November 27 2012

Think about this. An app in the user sense is? It is an elegant sometimes cool GUI to launch a service or task at the push of a button. One click not several. I have downloaded a few in my time using Android,Rim & Apple. I utilise about 20 on regular basis. I usually try out one or two that catch my fancy a week and then dump them if they are crap or dump the old one I am replacing it with. I have continued to get a new smart phone each year and that helps get the best Apps as the come to market as tests for free. It is cheaper to switch devices than waiting for software to be developed for older phones & tablets. The devices get better & cheaper each year. I was a big beleiver in Carr & IT Doesn't Matter Harvard fame but when you can get the good relability on a Samsung tablet for $200 why wait. The net is evolving not dying and a lot of Being Digital, Negroponte 1995 has come to pass. How many apps can you really use all the time maybe 30 to a 100 max. Some hard core gamers have maybe 500 to 1000 but they only follow the latest. I have used and discarded lots to date always on the hunt for the latest & useful. I think what is happening is just continuing extention of open sourcing,wide distribution, hacks,development & repackaging. It is interesting to note that one platform apps always cost a bit, while on the alternative platform you can get the same or similar for free. Longway to go before the web dies it is just a baby by my reckoning.

no-images

Bill Palmer on November 27 2012

As others have pointed out, the issue is not the "internet", it is how specific applications are implemented. Apps are specific to a device and typically utilize services available on that device, e.g., GPS, accelerometers, etc. HTML5 applications can run full multimedia programs in the browser without using plugins but can access some device specific services via a limited set of Application Program Interfaces (APIs). The real power of HTML5 is that applications can run anywhere, are not dependent upon device characteristics not accessible to it and hence are write once, use everywhere.

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