Jacqui Taylor (Global) - Bursting the IT Legacy
Cloud Computing

Jacqui Taylor (Global) - Bursting the IT Legacy

Given that we are in the midst of the worst recession in living memory I'm amazed that so few businesses are slashing costs by retiring their legacy IT infrastructure and replacing this with cloud services.

There is a genuine opportunity to innovate beyond the expensive on-premises solutions businesses have been saddled with for years, to cloud services that would allow the creation of added value services and new business models. I believe the delay is because there is one aspect of cloud services that is still not understood as a key reason to move: Cloud Bursting.

The majority of focus from a business viewpoint is still on the infrastructure provision, known as Infrastructure as a Service or the IaaS layer. The use of IaaS commonly provides a flexible environment for development and test environments, and provides this temporary capability at a fraction of the cost of the on-premises equivalent.

However, when a business shifts to using Platform as a Service (PaaS) as a Cloud provision this is where the paradigm shift of Cloud Services comes into play. Rather than temporary IaaS environments, provision of a PaaS allows the build of a production environment that would perform the same function as an on-premises live service but at a reduced cost.

In our legacy IT systems, we built to manage the capacity of a peak hour, day or month irrespective of how many of these existed in the business year. This ensured that our IT systems had capability and resources available year round to cope with the relatively few peaks, so unused capacity was the norm and services were therefore expensive.

When we build a PaaS we build only the minimum of infrastructure resources (‘provisioned' in Cloud-speak) so that you only pay for what you use at any given time and to meet the peaks we burst additional resources as required, hence the term Cloud Bursting. This is only possible using Cloud technology, as it requires very rapid creation (and corresponding destruction) of infrastructure resources.

The cost reduction which can be achieved using a PaaS service is therefore in direct proportion to the profile of the resources required to run the service at any given moment. The "peakier" the profile of the system, the more overall costs can be reduced, and the more flexible the service provision.

An example of a Cloud service which has implemented this Cloud Bursting capability in its ultimate form is a certain TV programme which would be live on a Saturday evening for just 1 hour and includes an audience vote for the winning act. It would be cost prohibitive to build an IT system along legacy lines to collect audience votes for less than an hour once a week. By comparison it's relatively cheap to build a PaaS which assumes a huge burst in resources to collect the audience votes between 8pm and 9pm.

Most businesses have a peaky profile and could dramatically change the cost of their IT infrastructure if they moved to a PaaS provision, and burst their Cloud Service to directly meet the peak profiles. I fully expect Cloud Bursting to be a key reason why moving to PaaS provision is the start of the second wave of Cloud adoption.

by Jacqui Taylor, CEO of FlyingBinary

 

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

«Dan Swinhoe (Asia) - Green IT in Asia

NEXT ARTICLE

Dan Swinhoe (Asia) - Cashing In On Delivery: eCommerce In India»

Comments

no-images

jesse on February 16 2013

1) you don't own the data when it is in the cloud. 2) you don't know who has access to your data 3) you can't access the cloud if your network connection fails. 4) you can't audit reliably The cloud apparently works, but only if you assume that any data you put there is public.

no-images

Alan Miles on February 18 2013

I don't agree for a number of reasons. Firstly, existing established systems may well be chugging along with minimal overhead. To switch to Cloud technologies has an establishment cost. Secondly, the cost of on-premise "Private Cloud" solutions has plunged. This offers the best of both worlds. If set up correctly, they require little if any support and provide the same sort of flexibility and reliability (well, better actually) than Public Cloud. There are other considerations ... http://www.amba.co.nz/Blog/tabid/96/EntryId/2/Cloud-Computing-what-is-it-and-what-to-consider-Take-care.aspx

no-images

Ernie Zibert on February 24 2013

Great article. It appears that some are reticent when it comes to the cloud. But if it's cheaper, smarter, better, faster and greener, which the cloud can be, then utilise it. All enterprises use the cloud in some guise today. Arguing if your network connection fails demonstrates to me last millennium IT thinking. IT needs to realise that for years it has become a twisted, corrupted creature called Gollum. Time to let The Ring go. This is a variant of Augmented Managed Services. Enjoy the read. http://strategicsourcingblog.blogspot.com.au/p/ams-next-stage-in-evolution-of-it.html

no-images

Jacqui Taylor on March 03 2013

Hi Jesse thanks for taking the time to comment. It is important to ensure that the SLA that you have negotiated with your Cloud provider is understood and fit for your purposes. I have replied to your individual points. 1) It is a common misconception that you don't "own" the data you have onboarded to a cloud service. In fact the reverse is true, you cannot transfer ownership of your data to your Cloud Services provider, which is why it is vital that you have a comprehensive Information Risk Strategy. 2) Modern encryption and sharding techniques with a comprehensive security access and control matrix ensure you know exactly who has access to your data. 3) I would seriously worry about any business that isn't already reliant on good network access for a large proportion of their BAU activities, cloud doesn't add any additional burden here. However offline access is usually available and easily paid for when you consider the financial benefits of moving to cloud platforms. 4) As part of your Cloud Service Provider's SLA'a, audit requirements are assumed. For the migrations we have done to the cloud over the last 3 years it has become apparent that this is a significant opportunity to overhaul the audit requirements of a company to bring them into our web world. Regarding the Public Cloud comment, Public/Private Hybrid essentially this is a horses for courses argument, but to explain properly probably needs another blog post!

no-images

Jacqui Taylor on March 03 2013

Hi Alan Thanks for taking the time to comment. I have sent a comprehensive comment to Jesse which also addresses most of what you have said. Burst capability is not limited to Public cloud as you have assumed this is capability which can be made available as part of the Cloud Service. As I said to Jesse Public/Private/Hybrid/Community is a matter of deciding which service would best suit your company. I don't agree with your Public Cloud statements, one of our most popular Public Cloud platforms is free! Additionally cost is not related whether you cloud service is private or public but rather the costs associated with the particular cloud provision you need. What is true for all cloud services is that an interoperable cloud stack beats an on premise bespoke system any day from a cost viewpoint.

no-images

jesse on February 16 2013

1) you don't own the data when it is in the cloud. 2) you don't know who has access to your data 3) you can't access the cloud if your network connection fails. 4) you can't audit reliably The cloud apparently works, but only if you assume that any data you put there is public.

no-images

Alan Miles on February 18 2013

I don't agree for a number of reasons. Firstly, existing established systems may well be chugging along with minimal overhead. To switch to Cloud technologies has an establishment cost. Secondly, the cost of on-premise "Private Cloud" solutions has plunged. This offers the best of both worlds. If set up correctly, they require little if any support and provide the same sort of flexibility and reliability (well, better actually) than Public Cloud. There are other considerations ... http://www.amba.co.nz/Blog/tabid/96/EntryId/2/Cloud-Computing-what-is-it-and-what-to-consider-Take-care.aspx

no-images

Ernie Zibert on February 24 2013

Great article. It appears that some are reticent when it comes to the cloud. But if it's cheaper, smarter, better, faster and greener, which the cloud can be, then utilise it. All enterprises use the cloud in some guise today. Arguing if your network connection fails demonstrates to me last millennium IT thinking. IT needs to realise that for years it has become a twisted, corrupted creature called Gollum. Time to let The Ring go. This is a variant of Augmented Managed Services. Enjoy the read. http://strategicsourcingblog.blogspot.com.au/p/ams-next-stage-in-evolution-of-it.html

no-images

Jacqui Taylor on March 03 2013

Hi Jesse thanks for taking the time to comment. It is important to ensure that the SLA that you have negotiated with your Cloud provider is understood and fit for your purposes. I have replied to your individual points. 1) It is a common misconception that you don't "own" the data you have onboarded to a cloud service. In fact the reverse is true, you cannot transfer ownership of your data to your Cloud Services provider, which is why it is vital that you have a comprehensive Information Risk Strategy. 2) Modern encryption and sharding techniques with a comprehensive security access and control matrix ensure you know exactly who has access to your data. 3) I would seriously worry about any business that isn't already reliant on good network access for a large proportion of their BAU activities, cloud doesn't add any additional burden here. However offline access is usually available and easily paid for when you consider the financial benefits of moving to cloud platforms. 4) As part of your Cloud Service Provider's SLA'a, audit requirements are assumed. For the migrations we have done to the cloud over the last 3 years it has become apparent that this is a significant opportunity to overhaul the audit requirements of a company to bring them into our web world. Regarding the Public Cloud comment, Public/Private Hybrid essentially this is a horses for courses argument, but to explain properly probably needs another blog post!

no-images

Jacqui Taylor on March 03 2013

Hi Alan Thanks for taking the time to comment. I have sent a comprehensive comment to Jesse which also addresses most of what you have said. Burst capability is not limited to Public cloud as you have assumed this is capability which can be made available as part of the Cloud Service. As I said to Jesse Public/Private/Hybrid/Community is a matter of deciding which service would best suit your company. I don't agree with your Public Cloud statements, one of our most popular Public Cloud platforms is free! Additionally cost is not related whether you cloud service is private or public but rather the costs associated with the particular cloud provision you need. What is true for all cloud services is that an interoperable cloud stack beats an on premise bespoke system any day from a cost viewpoint.

Add Your Comment

Most Recent Comments

Our Case Studies

IDG Connect delivers full creative solutions to meet all your demand generatlon needs. These cover the full scope of options, from customized content and lead delivery through to fully integrated campaigns.

images

Our Marketing Research

Our in-house analyst and editorial team create a range of insights for the global marketing community. These look at IT buying preferences, the latest soclal media trends and other zeitgeist topics.

images

Poll

Should companies have Bitcoins on hand in preparation for a Ransomware attack?