News roundup: AWS suffers outage, Salesforce eyes Slack, and the UK doubles down against Huawei

A roundup of this week's tech news, including a major AWS outage, a huge Salesforce/Slack acquisition rumour, and some major layoffs at IBM.

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AWS outage brings down a large slice of the internet

It's difficult to communicate just how significant Amazon's cloud computing behemoth Amazon Web Services (AWS) is for delivery of many core internet services and applications, as many of the world's largest enterprises and most important public institutions rely on its infrastructure to keep the digital universe continually ticking over. However, it became a bit easier this week, as the company experienced an multi-hour outage that ended up taking a considerable portion of the internet down with it.

While Amazon says only one of the its 23 geographic regions (US-East-1) was impacted, the outage was nevertheless significant enough to disrupt a large number of online services. Customers who experienced issues as a result of the outage included Adobe, 1Password, Autodesk, Glassdoor, Flickr, Roku,  Coinbase, DataCamp, and the Washington Post (amongst many others).

Amazon said the outage was affecting swathes of its AWS services, including (but not limited to) ACM, Amplify Console, AppStream2, AppSync, Athena, Batch, CodeArtifact, CodeGuru Profiler, CodeGuru Reviewer,  CloudMap, DynamoDB, Elastic Beanstalk, Lambda,  Rekognition, SageMaker, and Workspaces. The company confirmed it had resolved the issue affecting its Kinesis Data Streams API and had fixed other dependent services, gradually throttling service back to customers.

It really goes to demonstrate the sheer number of services that rely on AWS being 'always on', with just one problematic region sending shockwaves through the internet. The issue even took out basic household items such as vacuums and doorbells as consumers reported problems with iRobot and Ring connected devices. Welcome to 2020, my friends. 

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