The fluffiest (usable) clouds have solid foundations

Given the 3D (or perhaps 4D) honeycomb of interconnected blocks that now comes together to form the increasingly cloud-native nature of the modern IT double-helix, it is perhaps no surprise that the term ‘IT stack’ has been popularised, but have we built its foundational backbone strong enough to withstand the toughest tasks?

sunrise on blue sky. View over the clouds.
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In the new IT stack, technology is inherently networked. From base infrastructure layers into platform-level tiers of technology and then upwards to applications, data  and additional intelligence and analytics services, the topography of networking is multi-textured and complex.

That networking effect works to connect networks to networks, but before that external action, it also works to connect the lower substrate layers on an IT installation with the higher tiers as we journey upwards to the User Interface (UI), or to the point at which an IT service connects with another machine.

Given the 3D (or perhaps 4D) honeycomb of interconnected blocks that now comes together to form the increasingly cloud-native nature of the modern IT double-helix, it is perhaps no surprise that the term ‘IT stack’ has been popularised, but have C-suite managers built its foundational backbone strong enough to withstand the toughest tasks and functions?

Cloud can do ‘most’ things

If we’re looking through the Cloud Services Provider (CSP) menu of functionality options, we tend to find that cloud can do ‘most’ things you would expect a standalone high-powered computer or server to be capable of. Where the core CSPs are not always specialist practitioners (after all, they need to run datacenters and keep the heartbeat going), the IT industry has developed a raft of operational vendors who can be called upon for specific functions.

Working in this precise space is Cohesity. Keen to self-style itself as a next-generation data management company, Cohesity offers the kind of Backup-as-a-Service (BaaS) offering that organisations need when they realise their core cloud service doesn’t extend to exceptional precision-engineered Disaster Recovery (DR) capabilities.

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