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Lian Li's wild new PC cases mimic cruise ships and double as standing desks

Lian Li’s famous in enthusiast circles not just for creating computer cases—it’s known for creating crazily audacious enclosures that twist your perception of what a computer case can be. This is the company behind cases shaped like spidersseashells, and trains (oh my!) after all. And at CES 2016, Lian Li’s keeping the tradition alive with not one, but two new case designs that will leave you wondering “How the heck do you fit a PC in there?”

A Lian Li representative shared the short teaser video above exclusively with PCWorld, showcasing the company’s upcoming designs: A computer case that doubles as a standing desk, and another open-air case that looks like a cruise ship. Yes, really.

Sadly, Lian Li isn’t spilling the beans about technical details for the two cases yet, though I’ll be checking them out firsthand at CES 2016 next week. Judging by the cutouts in the rear of the cruise ship, your motherboard and graphics card will apparently slot into the transparent upper portion of the case, presumably leaving the bottom open to stash your storage drives and whatnot.

Lian Li’s standing desk, meanwhile, appears to be a fitness-focused variant of the company’s DK line of cases, which have already gone through several iterations after kicking off the “desks that hold your PCs inside” craze along with Red Harbinger’s Cross Desk. Expect a loadout similar to what you’d find in Lian Li’s existing computer desks, but likely with adjustable-height legs. The brief glimpses we get through the glass in the video above seem to show ample room for beastly PC hardware.

IDG Insider

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