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Uber now accepting PayPal in a sign of global ambition

The popular--and controversial--car-hailing app Uber has its roots in San Francisco, but the company is thinking globally with a new PayPal partnership.

Credit cards aren't a distinctly American form of payment, but they aren't quite as ubiquitous in other parts of the world, which is where PayPal comes in. Now Uber customers in the U.S., Germany, Italy, France, and the Netherlands can use PayPal to pay for their rides.

"As we've launched Uber in new cities around the world, we've learned many new things," the company said in a Tuesday blog post. "For example, in Bogota, there is no 'black car service'--professional drivers have white cards.

"But one of the most important things we've learned: while we Americans charge our credit cards with abandon, not everyone does."

Uber is encouraging new and current users to use PayPal for rides with a promotion. If you use PayPal to pay for an Uber (excluding Uber Taxi) by Nov. 28, you get $15 off, no discount code required.

Uber is expanding quickly--the company announces tests or launches in cities around the world on a regular basis. Payment method is likely the least of the company's problems when it comes to international growth, but the announcement is a small step toward turning Uber into a global company.

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