nick20psyhogeos20vice20president20of20the20oem20business20solutions20group20of20microsoft500
Business Management

Microsoft partners with Samsung, HP to help stop Windows piracy

Hewlett-Packard and Samsung Electronics will now ensure that their PCs in China are installed with licensed Windows and Office software as part of new agreements signed with Microsoft meant to fight piracy.

Microsoft announced the agreements Wednesday as the company brought its latest anti-piracy campaign to the Chinese city of Nanjing. Since December, Microsoft's "Keep it Real" campaign has been educating the Chinese public on security risks of using unlicensed Windows software. In addition, the U.S. software giant has been warning dozens of PC resellers in China to stop dealing in pirated copies of its software products.

Wednesday's agreements call for the two companies to also require their direct channel partners to promote genuine Microsoft software.

In March, Microsoft signed a similar agreement with Lenovo, China's largest PC maker. At the time, Microsoft said the deal would help limit and prevent PCs, moving "downstream" through China's channels, from being installed with pirated versions of Windows.

Much of the bootleg software ending up on PCs results from manufacturers installing a free non-Windows operating system on the device before it ships, according to Nick Psyhogeos, vice president of Microsoft's OEM business solutions group. To keep costs down, distributors will at some point usually install an unlicensed version of Windows on to the PC before it goes for sale.

Onezero, an electronics retailer with stores in China, has also pledged to sell PCs pre-installed with genuine copies of Windows, said Microsoft on Wednesday.

The U.S. software giant has been fighting piracy in China for years. In 2011, the country was second behind the U.S. in the commercial value of its software piracy, which was valued at US$8.9 billion, according to a study from the Business Software Alliance. China is now the world's largest PC market, and the value of its software piracy is expected to surpass the that of the U.S. soon.

Microsoft recently studied 221 PCs bought in China that had been installed with unlicensed versions of Windows, and found that often they contained security threats. Of the 221 PCs, 54 percent contained malware, while another 56 percent had their firewalls tampered with or disabled.

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« Man of Steel soundtrack gets in your head with surround sound

NEXT ARTICLE

Superslim Huawei P6 smartphone looks great, but don't expect a U.S. launch »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Recommended for You

Future-proofing the Middle East

Keri Allan looks at the latest trends and technologies

FinancialForce profits from PSA investment

Martin Veitch's inside track on today’s tech trends

Amazon Cloud looms over China: Bezos enters Alibaba home ground

Lewis Page gets down to business across global tech

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?