spotifyparty100633724orig

Spotify gets a Party mode with adjustable moods

Spotify is hoping to set the soundtrack for your next gathering with a new Party mode.

The streaming music service already offers dozens of ready-made party playlists, but Party mode goes a step further. Start by choosing a mix, such as “Crowd Pleasers” or “Hip Hop Takeover,” and as the music plays, a slider lets you choose from three “mood” or energy levels.

Adjusting the mood slider doesn’t just change tracks. It also creates a blend effect so the music doesn’t stop playing. Likewise, each playlist flows from one track to the next, so it sounds like there’s a DJ running the show. (Spotify says it used actual DJs do the mixing, and has partnered with Diplo in particular on a Spotify-exclusive “Diplo and friends” playlist.)

This isn’t Spotify’s only attempt to go beyond the playlist and address some specific use cases. In May, the company introduced a Running mode that matches music's beats per minute to a runner’s pace. Spotify also appears to be considering a “Car Mode” for safer use while driving. (Rival service Rhapsody has followed a similar path, with both Car and Kids modes that launched earlier this year.)

Party mode is rolling out now to Spotify’s iOS and Android apps, TechCrunch reports. It’s unclear if the feature will make its way to Spotify’s web and desktop versions.

Why this matters: With every on-demand streaming music service charging the same price for paid subscriptions, and offering similar catalogs (with some notable exceptions), differentiation is difficult. Spotify’s main advantage continues to be its free offering, but interactive features like Running and Party are a way to make its paid service stand out as well.

IDG Insider

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« Acts of terrorism could push Congress toward encryption backdoors in 2016

NEXT ARTICLE

IBM-Apple deal reaches key milestone with 100th enterprise app »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Recommended for You

Trump hits partial pause on Huawei ban, but 5G concerns persist

Phil Muncaster reports on China and beyond

FinancialForce profits from PSA investment

Martin Veitch's inside track on today’s tech trends

Future-proofing the Middle East

Keri Allan looks at the latest trends and technologies

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?