160229gmail100647649orig

Gmail for Work gets improved digital loss protection features

Google has expanded the digital loss protection features in Gmail for Work, to help ensure that employees don't share confidential information outside the company they work for.

The service can now use optical character recognition on attachments, so administrators can ensure that employees aren't sharing mounds of confidential data in images (whether intentionally or not). That adds to existing features such as the ability to look inside common attachment types, including documents and spreadsheets.

The OCR capabilities integrate with content detectors, so administrators can do things like prevent members of the accounting department from sending an email with a credit card number in it to someone outside the organization. It's a key feature for businesses worried about confidential information leaving the company, even if employees don't mean to do anything wrong.

Google added more predefined content detectors with this update, including ones that cover personally identifiable information in additional countries, and ones that better cover medical data.

Organizations that want finer control over their DLP policies can take advantage of new parameters in Gmail for Work's settings to do things like set up different policies based on whether a message contains a few pieces of personally identifiable information or dozens.

Google first added DLP to Gmail for Work in December. Improving its capabilities is important for Google as it tries to compete with Microsoft and other providers to sell more productivity services to businesses.

IDG Insider

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« Judge strikes down order for Apple to hack an iPhone in a New York case

NEXT ARTICLE

People trusted this robot in an emergency, even when it led them astray »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?