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IT & Systems Management

Mark your calendars, RPG fans: Dragon Age Inquisition finally has a launch date

October 7 is shaping up to be a hectic day. As if it weren't enough that Shadow of Mordor (the new Lord of the Rings game) and Alien: Isolation (the new Aliens game) were dropping, now Dragon Age: Inquisition is now slated to launch the very same morning. Yes, it's finally official: On October 7 you can finally get to inquisiting on Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.

If you're still haunted by memories of Dragon Age II, maybe put those aside for the moment. I'm not going to claim ahead of release that Inquisition will be fantastic, but it sounds like BioWare hopefully learned some lessons from the failures of the last game. Inquisition's environments are apparently much larger and more varied than either of the previous Dragon Age games--yes, even the areas in the legendary Dragon Age: Origins.

Also returning after disappearing in Dragon Age II: playable races, non-regenerative health, and the top-down tactical combat view. This is (hopefully) a game for core fans of the series, for people who like RPGs with a lot of options and depth.

And it looks gorgeous to boot.

BioWare has its work cut out. After years of being one of the game industry's darlings, the company's fallen rapidly out of favor what with Dragon Age II's catastrophic reception, Star Wars: The Old Republic less-than-explosive debut, and the Mass Effect III ending controversy. Dragon Age: Inquisition could be the company's last chance to win back old fans.

We'll see how BioWare did with Dragon Age Inquisition soon enough. All we have to do is survive the boring, empty summer months between now and October.

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