youtubehdrvideo100692237orig

YouTube adds HDR support to make videos more vibrant

YouTube's adding another buzzword to its stable of video technology.

The Google-owned service already rolled support for 4K resolution, 360-degree video, spatial audio, and 60 frames-per-second videos (in a hat-tip to gamers) in recent months. Now, YouTube's pulling the trigger on high-dynamic range (HDR) videos, nearly 7 months after Netflix first introduced HDR support.

HDR's the up and coming display technology for encouraging more people to upgrade their TV sets. HDR offers truer colors than standard displays thanks to a wider range of dark and light. Improving colors using HDR has a few noticeable side effects, including better contrast, more vibrant visuals, and a generally clearer picture.

As of Monday, YouTube supports HDR, but right now there are only a limited number of videos that take advantage of the new feature. Google suggests that audio/visual fans check out this YouTube HDR playlist featuring content from MysteryGuitarMan, Jacob + Katie Schwarz, and Abandon Visuals.

Google

A simulated look at the difference between SDR and HDR.

YouTube creators can now upload HDR videos to YouTube to keep the high quality colors rolling. Hoping to encourage more HDR content, the YouTube Spaces in Los Angeles and New York are equipped with HDR-capable gear for creators.

The impact on you at home: To view HDR vidoes you'll need an HDR-equipped television set as well as an HDR-capable device, such as the $69 Chromecast Ultra. Google says 2016 Samsung 4K TVs will also soon support YouTube HDR. Unfortunately, PC monitors featuring HDR have yet to hit the streets.

IDG Insider

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« Aon beefs up its cyber insurance portfolio with acquisition

NEXT ARTICLE

Android patches fix Drammer RAM attack, but not Dirty Cow exploit »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Recommended for You

Trump hits partial pause on Huawei ban, but 5G concerns persist

Phil Muncaster reports on China and beyond

FinancialForce profits from PSA investment

Martin Veitch's inside track on today’s tech trends

Future-proofing the Middle East

Keri Allan looks at the latest trends and technologies

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?