larryellisonoracleopenworld2016day2100683648orig

Larry Ellison says Amazon is '20 years behind' Oracle

Larry Ellison continued his assault on Amazon during his second keynote address at Oracle OpenWorld on Tuesday.

"Amazon Web Services are simply not optimized for the Oracle Database. I'll go further than that: Amazon Web Services aren't optimized for their own databases either, as you will see," he said, while showing off a set of benchmarks that showed Oracle Database performing several times faster on Oracle's cloud than it does on Amazon's cloud. "It doesn't get better, it gets worse."

Ellison ripped into AWS, accusing the cloud provider of being 20 years behind on releasing features for its Redshift and Aurora database services compared to Oracle Database. It was part of his pitch to customers to move their workloads into Oracle's public cloud offering, rather than go with Amazon for similar services.

Ellison's latest salvo is part of Oracle's continuing campaign to try and show the world that its cloud is faster than the market leader, at least when it comes to its own benchmarks.

According to Ellison, Oracle Database running on Oracle's cloud is 24 times faster for analytic workloads than the same software running on AWS, and 8 times faster for OLTP workloads. In a similar vein, he said that Oracle Database in the company's cloud was 105 times faster than Amazon Redshift for analytics workloads, and 35 times faster than Amazon Aurora for OLTP workloads.

It's not clear how these benchmarks were designed, how much the particular workloads are skewed to benefit the features Oracle has in its database, and whether or not Oracle was using equivalent hardware for the tests in its cloud and the tests in Amazon's cloud.

Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Google published its own benchmarks a couple months ago claiming that the second version of its Cloud SQL database as a service product outperformed Aurora at lower thread counts. After that, Amazon partner 2nd Watch published a blog post showing that it re-ran Google's tests and got different results, showing improved performance for Aurora.

So there's clearly room for debate when it comes to how to interpret these benchmark numbers.

Exact details (and potentially accuracy) aside, these numbers may help sway companies -- especially Oracle customers -- as they consider moving their workloads to the cloud. The company has spent OpenWorld this year pushing its cloud platform. 

Amazon will have a chance to fire back later this year at its Re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, which takes place at the end of November. That's usually when the company announces a salvo of new products, and was where it introduced its Aurora database two years ago. 

IDG Insider

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« ​"Amazon's lead is over" - Why Oracle is off-target in cloud

NEXT ARTICLE

Samsung ships 500,000 replacement Note7s for recall exchange »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Recommended for You

Trump hits partial pause on Huawei ban, but 5G concerns persist

Phil Muncaster reports on China and beyond

FinancialForce profits from PSA investment

Martin Veitch's inside track on today’s tech trends

Future-proofing the Middle East

Keri Allan looks at the latest trends and technologies

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?