brendaneich100259498orig

JavaScript founder Brendan Eich: WebAssembly is a game-changer

When it comes to the Web's future, JavaScript creator Brendan Eich remains bullish on WebAssembly but also gives a thumbs-up to Google's Service Worker technology.

Speaking at the O'Reilly Fluent conference in San Francisco on Wednesday, Eich called WebAssembly the most exciting development he has seen in the past year. The project boosts Web performance by providing a portable code format to run in browsers at native speeds. Major browser vendors Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla all are on board with the effort.

The technology, serving as a binary syntax, started with the asm.js subset of JavaScript. At some point, WebAssembly "becomes the safe native format for the Web," he said, adding it will help bring the Web equal to native applications in performance.

Eich, CEO of Brave Software, also lauded Service Workers technology, which supports bootstrapping of mobile Web applications while offline and are part of Google and Mozilla's Progressive Web Apps plan. The concept of Service Workers is supported in the Extensible Web Manifesto philosophy, and Eich encouraged developers to learn about it.

Eich also backs the Decorators plan by Ember.js creator Yehuda Katz. Decorators is a JavaScript proposal to annotate and modify classes and properties at design time. Additionally, Eich lauded WebGL, which provides a 3D rendering standard for Web development.

During his 20-minute presentation, Eich linked development of Web standards to mobile platforms: "What we're now seeing is the co-evolution of the Web standards with the two dominant smartphone OSes -- Android and iOS."

Microsoft, meanwhile has been "kind of acting like Mozilla," with its venture into open source, Eich reasoned. "They open-sourced Chakra Core, their JavaScript engine, on GitHub." Google's Android, meanwhile, has become Windows, but Apple remains Apple, in Eich's estimation.

When it comes to JSON pioneer Douglas Crockford's Seif project to boost Web security through the use of cryptographic services and trust management, Eich is taking a wait-and-see approach. "It's not probably going to get wide adoption, this Project Seif," said Eich.

IDG Insider

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« Nexus 6P software update fixes several performance issues

NEXT ARTICLE

4K Roku TVs start shipping, but the screens are small »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Recommended for You

International Women's Day: We've come a long way, but there's still an awfully long way to go

Charlotte Trueman takes a diverse look at today’s tech landscape.

Trump's trade war and the FANG bubble: Good news for Latin America?

Lewis Page gets down to business across global tech

20 Red-Hot, Pre-IPO companies to watch in 2019 B2B tech - Part 1

Martin Veitch's inside track on today’s tech trends

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?