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Mos Go review: A flawed battery pack

Note: The following is part of our roundup of USB-C battery packs.

When I first opened the Mos Go battery pack, I pegged at as my top choice for a small, portable battery. I was so wrong.

From the initial charge, connecting it directly to a USB-C cable and wall adapter without any extra equipment, I felt as if it was taking far too long to charge.

Once it was fully charged, I tested the efficiency of its 12,000 mAh (44.4Wh) battery and it came in at a respectable 86.37%. At that point, I was loving its compact design, two USB-C ports and a single USB-A port.

Then I began to measure the amount of time it took to recharge, and was left puzzled by its recharge specs of 5V/0.579A. That means it takes a crazy 15 hours to charge the Mos Go from empty to full

I tested every USB-C cable and wall adapter I own in an effort to troubleshoot the puzzling charge time, with no luck.

In comparison, the biggest battery I tested was more than double this capacity and took under 10 hours to completely charge. And the RAVPower recharged in four hours using USB-C.

I brought up the issue with the team at Mos, and it seems a firmware update will correct the issue I experienced. Unfortunately, it’s not something that I can load into the battery pack myself. I have requested a fixed unit when the team has one available, and will update this review if needed.

As for the rest of the unit, there’s a dedicated USB-C port for charging (marked as OUT), another for the device itself (marked as IN), and a USB-A port for charging standard smartphones not in need of QC 2.0 and the like.

The indicator lights are just above the Out port, with a gentle shake bringing them to life to give you a quick glimpse at the current battery level of the Mos Go.

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