What is a liquid retina display?

What is a liquid retina display?

The new iPhone XR features Apple's first Liquid Retina Display. Here's what you need to know about it.

What is a Liquid Retina Display?

A Liquid Retina Display is a type of LCD display, currently only found in the iPhone XR.

Like the regular Retina display found in other iPhones, the Liquid Retina Display relies on a higher level of pixels-per-inch to create a paper-like screen effect where pixels are not visible to the naked eye.

However, unlike the Super HD Retina Display found in the iPhone X, iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max, the Liquid Retina Display in the iPhone XR relies on an miniaturized LCD display panel rather than an OLED one.

What is the resolution of a Liquid Retina Display?

The Liquid Retina display found in the iPhone XR boasts a resolution of 1792 x 828 and a pixel density of 328 ppi.

What devices use a Liquid Retina Display?

Read more: Apple's new iPhone XS and XS Max are set to be the company's most expensive yet

Currently, the only device that uses a Liquid Retina Display is the iPhone XR.

Apple trademarked the term Retina in 2012, so don't expect any other smartphone brands to boast Retina displays any time soon.

Is a Liquid Retina Display better than a regular retina display?

No.

Read more: Apple leaks new iPhone names ahead of big reveal

While there are some older iPad and Macbooks that are capable of matching the iPhone XR's liquid retina display for pixel density, almost all the the HD and Super HD Retina displays found in the last several generations of iPhone have the XR's Liquid Retina Display beat.

In addition, the OLED-based Retina displays found in the iPhone X. iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max boast significantly higher pixel-counts, pixel-density and contrast-ratios.

IDG Insider

PREVIOUS ARTICLE

« What CIOs can learn from startups

NEXT ARTICLE

iPhone to Android: The ultimate switching guide »
author_image
IDG News Service

The IDG News Service is the world's leading daily source of global IT news, commentary and editorial resources. The News Service distributes content to IDG's more than 300 IT publications in more than 60 countries.

  • Mail

Recommended for You

Trump hits partial pause on Huawei ban, but 5G concerns persist

Phil Muncaster reports on China and beyond

FinancialForce profits from PSA investment

Martin Veitch's inside track on today’s tech trends

Future-proofing the Middle East

Keri Allan looks at the latest trends and technologies

Poll

Do you think your smartphone is making you a workaholic?