GitHub offers free private repos for small projects Credit: PuppetSupplied Art
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GitHub offers free private repos for small projects

Following what rivals GitLab and Atlassian BitBucket already have done, the GitHub code-sharing site is offering free private repos as part of its GitHub Free service for small developer groups. Three collaborators are allowed per free private repo. Previously, private repos were fee-based; private repos with more than three collaborators continue to require a paid account.

GitLab’s free tier offers unlimited private projects allowing for 2,000 continuous integration minutes per month on shared runners. BitBucket offers free, unlimited private repos for as many as five users.

GitHub also is unifying its enterprise cloud and on-premises products.

GitHub also has unified its GitHub Business Cloud and Enterprise products, offering these via a single subscription also called GitHub Enterprise. The component products are now named Enterprise Cloud and Enterprise Server. Users no longer have to buy seats for both Server and Enterprise Cloud deployments, which could result in savings.

Using the GitHub Connect service, Enterprise Server users can access the cloud to search for open source code or join online communities.

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