Eufy RoboVac 15C Max review: This machine is a budget-friendly super sucker Credit: EufySupplied Art
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Eufy RoboVac 15C Max review: This machine is a budget-friendly super sucker

The RoboVac 15C Max is the latest in Eufy’s new series of super-sucking RoboVac robot vacuums. Like the RoboVac 11S Max we recently reviewed,  it’s a re-engineering of one of the company’s existing products—in this case the 15C—for stronger suction power and better dirt collection.

The key enhancements here are the same as in the 11S Max. Maximum suction has  increased to 2000Pa from 1300Pa. The UniBody filter has been redesigned to be more efficient, resulting in longer life. And the 0.6-liter dustbin has a wider wind tunnel, with an inclined filter position to better capture all the extra dust and debris the 15C Max will be sucking up.

These upgrades aside, the 15C Max isn’t radically different from its earlier iteration. Its tempered glass cover has a sleek new design, but the rest of the body looks unchanged, and it has kept its slim, 2.85-inch profile. Underneath, there’s still a single roller brush and a pair of spinning edge-cleaner brushes, two traction wheels, and an omni-directional wheel. The dustbin slips easily out from the back with the push of a release button.

15c max profile Eufy

The 15C Max’s slim profile enables it to easily get in and out from under furniture.

Setup and app

The setup process is the same as with other Eufy RoboVacs. You flip a power switch on the side to “on” and place the vacuum in its accompanying charging dock.

Once it’s fully charged, you can control RoboVac 15C Max using its physical remote or the EufyHome companion app. Both provide control over starting and stopping jobs, selecting cleaning modes and suction power, and directing the vacuum manually. But the physical remote requires line of sight, while the app lets you control the vacuum from anywhere in your home, over your wireless network. It also enables you to schedule cleanings and receive alerts when the 15C Max gets into trouble. Advantage: app.

Setting up the app was simple. Once I selected the “add device” option, it automatically found the 15C Max and my Wi-Fi and directed me to log in. From there, I only needed to select the 15C Max from the device list when I wanted to start a cleaning job.

15c max auto mode Michael Ansaldo/IDG

You can select from four cleaning modes and three suction levels.

The app has a clean, eye-catching design using turquoise accents against a black background. A directional pad and start/stop button is front and center. Buttons for selecting a cleaning mode, scheduling, sending the vacuum back to its dock, and using the “find my robot” feature run along the bottom.

There are four cleaning modes. In Auto, the 15C Max will clean your space until it has covered the whole area or its battery runs low. It will then return to its dock. Single-room mode performs a quick 30-minute cleaning. Spot mode activates a two-minute spiral cleaning that’s ideal for spills or patches of concentrated dirt. And Edge mode reduces the vacuum’s speed as it cleans along walls for 20 minutes before returning it to its dock.

When you choose Auto or Room mode, you also have the option to select a suction power: Standard; BoostIQ, which automatically optimizes suction power for the job; and Max. Not surprisingly, each of these levels corresponds with an increase in battery consumption. I consistently got 90- to 100 minutes of cleaning using Standard suction, but that would drop to 30- to 40 minutes if I kept Max suction on.

If you’re an Amazon Alexa or Google Home user, you can also pair the 15C Max with those digital assistants to enable voice control. You won’t get the same breadth of control as with the remote or app, but you’ll be able to perform the basics, including starting and stopping cleaning jobs and sending the vacuum back to its dock.

Performance

The 15C Max navigates using more than 10 infrared sensors that help it avoid obstacles and cliffs, detect walls, and track how far it has traveled. Because it’s responding to sensory input, its ping-ponging cleaning path doesn’t look particularly efficient, but it did cover the entirety of my living room, kitchen, and entryway in time. It transitioned smoothly between carpet and hardwood floors without any hang-ups, and it maneuvered stealthily around, under, and between furniture.

On the few occasions it did get stuck, it was on some clutter I neglected to pick up before starting the cleaning job. In those instances, I received an alert on my phone while at the same time the vacuum emitted an insistent beep I could hear all the way upstairs. That beeping wouldn’t stop until I cleared the obstruction, but once I did I just had to press the start/stop button on the vacuum or in the app to resume the cleaning.

15c max alert Michael Ansaldo/IDG

The EufyHome app alerts when the robot vacuum gets into trouble.

The 15C Max did a fantastic job of not just sucking up food crumbs, dirt, and pet hair, but compacting it efficiently in the dustbin. That typically meant I only had to empty it once per cleaning job, rather than two or three times as I often need to do with other robot vacuums. I also appreciated that it kept dust from pluming out when I popped the dustbin lid open.

Bottom line

I used the RoboVac 15C Max daily during my testing period, and it delivered everything I want from a robot vacuum: autonomy, easy operation, and—most importantly—a thorough cleaning. Those things may not be as sexy as laser mapping and virtual “no-go” boundaries, but I’d argue they matter more. If you’re similarly pragmatic about your purchases, the RoboVac 15C Max should have a place near the top of your shopping list.

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